“Form follows function.” –Frank Lloyd Wright

Today I was helping a student write a book review. She had written a rambling summary and a rambling review. It felt wonderful to be able to point out to her that there is a specific form for writing a review. I was able to point out to her which parts of her draft adhered to the genre’s expectations and how to tighten the remainder of the draft to fit a reader’s expectations.

And this is one of the most powerful tools for teaching writing, being able to teach form, formulas, or reader expectations for specific genres.

Providing students with a form for a writing assignment takes the magic out of the writing experience. This can be good and bad.

It can be good in that students who don’t believe they are capable of writing such complicated communications find these pieces of writing aren’t as complicated as they thought.

It can be bad in that students who are naturally creative writers may feel confined by the formula.

But, I explain to my students that formulas are like training wheels on bicycles. They are there to steady the writing/riding and they aren’t necessary once we have our balance.

I also explain that only really good riders pop wheelies or do bunny-hops or ride with no hands. We must become proficient at the formula before we can perform tricks.

A quick search will provide teachers, tutors and parents with graphic organizers for planning to write a variety of genres.

Form truly does follow function. Yet, it is true that this weekend when I was trying to hang a new ceiling fan in my son’s bedroom, the directions more closely resembled the diction of a poem than a recipe for successful installation.

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